Reed's Parliamentary Rules
Chapter XVIII -- Forms
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270. For Calling a Meeting.— The undersigned invite all persons desiring to form a Circulating Library Association for the town of Hudson to meet at Deering Hall on Saturday, the 15th day of July, at 3 o’clock in the afternoon.

                J.R. REYNOLDS.

                M.F. BANKS.

                S.R. HAMMOND.

271. Calling to Order.— Mr. Reynolds having been designated to do so, or of his own motion, rises in his place at the time appointed and says, “The time having arrived for opening this meeting I take the liberty to call it to order, and nominate Mr. Banks as Chairman, and if it be your pleasure that he serve you as Chairman you will please say aye.” Then the ayes having voted, he adds, “Those opposed, no. The ayes have it, and Mr. Banks will take the chair.”

Or Mr. Reynolds may say, “The time having arrived at which this meeting was invited to assemble, I call it to order. Will some one please nominate a Chairman?” Thereupon, if several are nominated, the name first presented is first put to vote and then the next, until a Chairman is obtained.

Another form:

Or, if the meeting be a county (city or State) convention, Mr. Reynolds may say, “As Chairman of the County Committee, the time having arrived for the convention to meet, I call it to order, and under direction of the committee nominate Mr. Banks to be Chairman. Is it your pleasure that he serve you as Chairman? If so, please manifest it by saying aye." Then after a pause, “Those opposed say no. The ayes have it. Mr. Banks is chosen Chairman and will please take the chair.” If the vote should be doubted, then it can be verified by a hand vote or by calling the roll. If Mr. Banks does not receive a majority, then the Chairman of the County Committee would call for nominations. Of course other nominations could be made before the vote, and if the Chairman of the committee anticipates any contest he should give opportunity for nominations before he puts any vote.

272. The Chairman.— The Chairman upon taking the chair usually acknowledges the compliment paid him by a few words of thanks, and then says he awaits the further pleasure of the assembly. Whereupon some one nominates Mr. Hammond as Secretary. The Chairman then announces that Mr. Hammond has been nominated, and asks if there are any other nominations, and puts the question to the assembly, and it is voted on in the same way as at the election of the Chairman.

The organization being thus completed, the Chairman reads, or causes the Secretary to read, the call for the meeting, and then the business proceeds upon some motion made by a member, which may be for the appointment of a committee to examine credentials, or for permanent organization, or a resolution to express the sentiment of the meeting, which will be open to all subsidiary and incidental motions and subject to interruptions by privileged motions.

273. Parliamentary Inquiries.— If a member desires to know what will be the effect of a certain action if taken by the assembly, or desires to know how to proceed to accomplish a certain result, he rises and says:

“Mr. Chairman, I rise to a parliamentary inquiry.”
The Chairman: “The gentleman will state his inquiry.”
The member: “Mr. Chairman, if this motion to non-concur is defeated what will be the effect?”
The Chairman: “The effect will be to concur.”
The member: “Would a motion to concur be in order so that we might have a direct vote?”
The Chairman: “It would.”

Another example:

“Mr. Chairman, a parliamentary inquiry.”
“The gentleman will state it.”
“Do not the rules require this bill to be first considered in the Committee of the Whole?”
“The gentleman can ascertain that by making the point. The Chair thinks so, but will not rule until the question is presented.”
The member: “Then, Mr. Chairman, I make the point of order.”

274. Points of Order.— The last example gives a form for this incidentally. The usual course when a point of order is made is for the member to rise and say:

“Mr. Chairman, I rise to a point of order.”
The Chairman: “The gentleman will state his point of order.”
The member: “Mr. Chairman, the point of order is this: Our rules provide that at 10 o’clock unfinished business shall be taken up. It is now 10 o’clock.”
The Chairman: “The point is well taken, and the Chair will lay before the assembly the unfinished business.” Or the member may rise and say, “Mr. Chairman, I call the member to order and ask that his words be taken down.” Thereupon the words are reported by the stenographer and read to the assembly, and the assembly takes action.

275. Subsidiary Motions.— Consideration.

The member: “Mr. Chairman, I raise the question of consideration.”
The Chairman: “The gentleman raises the question of consideration. As many as are in favor of consideration will say aye. Those opposed, no. The ayes have it, and the assembly will proceed to the consideration of the question.” Or, “The noes have it, and the assembly refuses to consider.”

276. Lay on the Table.—

“Mr. Chairman, I move that the resolution be laid on the table.”

277. Postponement.—

“Mr. Chairman, I move that the order be indefinitely postponed.” “Mr. Chairman, I move that the further consideration of the resolution be postponed to the 10th of next July at 10 a.m.”

After this last motion is in possession of the assembly a member may move to amend.

“Mr. Chairman, I move to amend by striking out the word ‘July’ and inserting the word ‘August.’”

278. Commit.—

“Mr. Chairman, I move that the motion be committed to a committee of ten to be appointed by the Chair.”

“Mr. Chairman, I move that the order be committed to the standing committee on assembly expenses, with instructions to ascertain and report to the assembly if such expenditure is necessary and can be properly paid out of the funds already collected.”

279. Motions to Amend.—

“Mr. Chairman, I move to strike out the following words (stating them) in the first two lines of the paragraph.”

“Mr. Chairman, I move to insert between the words ————— and —————— in the second line of the paragraph the following words (stating them).”

“Mr. Chairman, I move to strike out the words (stating them) in the second line of the paragraph and insert in their place the words (stating them).” Or, “Mr. Chairman, I move to strike out the words (stating them) in the third line of the paragraph and add the following words (stating them).”

280. Previous Question.—

“Mr. Chairman, I move the previous question.”

The Chairman: “The gentleman moves the previous question, and the question before the House is, shall the main question be now put? As many as are in favor,” etc.

This is the usual form, but under the American practice, especially in view of its extension as in Rule XVII, House of Representatives, Sec. 268, it should be, “The question is upon agreeing to the demand for the previous question. As many as are in favor,” etc.

281. Adjournment.—

“Mr. Chairman, I move that the assembly do now adjourn.”

“Mr. Chairman, I move that the assembly adjourn to meet at 10 o’clock tomorrow morning.”

“Mr. Chairman, I move that when this assembly adjourns it adjourn to meet at 10 o’clock on Thursday next.”

282. Recess.—

“Mr. Chairman, I move the assembly take its recess.” (See Sec. 174.)

“Mr. Chairman, I move this assembly do now take a recess until 7 o’clock this evening.”

“Mr. Chairman, I move this assembly take a recess from 3 o’clock this afternoon until 10 o’clock tomorrow morning.”

283. Questions of Privilege.—

“Mr. Chairman, I rise to a question of privilege which affects the rights of this assembly.” Or, “Mr. Chairman, I rise to a question of personal privilege.”

The Chairman: “The gentleman will state his question of privilege.”

284. Incidental Motions.—

The modes of raising a point of order have been stated (Sec. 272). The other incidental motions are as follows:

285. Reading of Papers.—

“Mr. Chairman, I move that the paper (describing it) be read by the clerk.”

286. Suspension of Rules.—

“I move the rules be suspended and the resolution be passed.” (See Sec. 191.)

287. Withdrawal of Motion.—

“Mr. Chairman, I ask consent of the assembly to withdraw the resolution.”

288. Division of Question and Point of Order Thereon.—

“Mr. Chairman, I ask for a division of the question, and move that it be divided into three parts, the first to end with the word —— in the third line, and the second to end with the word —— in the sixth line.”

The Chairman: “The gentleman asks that the question be divided, and proposes the following division (reciting it). If the division is made, the assembly will first vote on the first proposition (stating it), then on the second (stating it), and then on the third (stating it).”

A member: “Mr. Chairman, I rise to a point of order.”

The Chairman: “The gentleman will state his point of order.”

The member: “The point of order is that one of the parts standing by itself is not a substantive proposition. If the first were negatived the rest would mean nothing if passed.”

The Chairman: “The point of order is sustained and the motion overruled.”